Arcosanti - An Urban Laboratory in the Arizona Desert.

Utilities

photo by Rob Jamesonphoto by Rob JamesonThe IT onsite administrator Travis Neal (on the left) is cordinating with workshoppers to install a series of conduits/ethernet cables in Camp where the WiFi signal is received from the transmitter up-the-hill and needs to be distributed to the key areas in camp for further WiFi redistribution.

[Text by ttmr and photos by rj]

photo by Rob Jamesonphoto by Rob JamesonThe workshop crew members are digging trenches to get ready for the hardwire (Cat5e) installation.

photo by Rob Jamesonphoto by Rob JamesonArcosanti has IT services providing onsite network capability connecting to the Internet. The dedicated fiber line was installed few years ago as the backbone internet services to the site. Once the services reach the site entrance (demarcation) point, our IT crew completes the distribution system throughout the site,


September 04. 2013

Here is more of the fiber optic service line installation, first reported on 9/2/2013.

[installation photos by Julia Dorn-Giarmoleo and Sue Kirsch, text by Tomiaki Tamura]

The conduits are 3" PVC schedule 80 (heavy duty) mostly buried in the ground.

In addition two custom-made concrete handholes were cast in place as junction boxes when the spooled lines need to be accommodated for slack requirements.











September 02. 2013

Arcosanti IT and utility crews have worked with CenturyLink project manager, engineers and contractors to bring a long-awaited fiber optic line to the Arcosanti site.

[photos by Sue Kirsch, text by Tomiaki Tamura]

They were strung along the existing telephone aerial cable running across in the desert stretch (1+ mile) from the newly installed vault at the Cordes Junction to our server room in the Visitor Center Building.

The previous broadband Internet services provided by the same vendor had the capacity of 3 MB (bonded T1 lines). Now the initial fiber service has bumped it up to 20 MB. It can go to 100 MB and even 1GB and beyond when our needs arise with this new fiber optic line.

Ron Chandler, installation crew leader, working with his staff and construction crew, along with workshoppers provided necessary conduits and handholes placed to carry the fiber once it left the last telephone pole near our site.

More of this on 9/4/2013.


November 22. 2010

Michael Bittman, aka Dr. Sparks, teaches the November workshop participants about solar electricity and its installation.

The show-and-tell, teaching/demonstration closet is used as an example for the lecture.


August 23. 2010

This continues the report of workshop participant Marina Sapunova from 8/20/10.

One of the most important parts of Arcosanti is a sensible use of solar energy. The Arcosanti location with a lot of sun all year round allows making different experiments with solar panels. There are some different types of them here.

Last week Nathan showed us Arcosanti’s panels and explained the main principles of they work. There are several PV (Photovoltaic) Systems and Solar Water Heating System here. And after theory introduction we went around to see how it works in reality.

The Solar Water Heating panels are situated on the ledge of the south-east slope of the hill. As Nathan told us before, the construction consists of many pipes that provide water; and the cover panel is made in such a way to accept sunlight to come in, but protect it from getting out, so it can reflect many times from an inside surface of the panel. The choice of a right angle of the panels depends upon what time of the year you want mostly use hot water. An advantage of using solar water heating system is that it deals directly with the sun and doesn’t need electricity for heating the water. It means more efficiency.

And there are also several PV panel systems at Arcosanti that generate electricity from the sun energy: at the parking lot, on the roof of the Lab Building, near the Dorms in the East Crescent Complex, and under the glass windows of the Red Room greenhouse. And there are several places with collectors and controllers for these panels. These modules are mostly used for night lightening (along the trails) and partly for dorms lightening. Though it couldn’t now cover all the expenses on regularly used electricity (because of amount), it’s still a large part of the experience, research and practice of solar panels.

Nowadays it is no more a secret that we have problems with fuel resources and ecology but a lot of people still don’t pay attention to the natural forces resource (sun, wind, water) and Arcosanti could be a good platform for research in this way. And of course what Nathan told us was very important to remind us as architectural, engineering students to think about the future, pollution and limits of natural sources, to be partly responsible for it.    

Marina's report continues on 8/25/10.

 


? In October of 2007, the Arizona Office of Tourism (AOT) rewarded a Rural Tourism Development Grant to Arcosanti. The grant, worth $50,000, was used to enhance the Visitors' Parking and Access area of the site.
We reported on 12/12, 12/17, 12/19, 12/21 and 12/26 about the first stage of work, installation of new concrete walk-ways and an upgrade of the visitors parking-lot. ? In October of 2007, the Arizona Office of Tourism (AOT) rewarded a Rural Tourism Development Grant to Arcosanti. The grant, worth $50,000, was used to enhance the Visitors' Parking and Access area of the site.
We reported on 12/12, 12/17, 12/19, 12/21 and 12/26 about the first stage of work, installation of new concrete walk-ways and an upgrade of the visitors parking-lot.


? We reported on the second stage of work, installation of solar panels and lighting, on 2/18 through 3/3, 3/10 and 3/12 and 3/17/08.
Arizona State University, under the leadership of Program Manager William Shisler, awarded Arcosanti a gift of solar panels from their Photovoltaic Testing Laboratory, to power the light fixtures. [View from Crafts III entrance north].


? All of the work on the installation of the solar panels, the electrical wiring, installation of lighting fixtures, was done by Cosanti Foundation crew, with the help of workshop participants and volunteers.
Light fixtures and control equipment for the lighting were purchased from NIGHTSCAPING.
Visitors Center entrance looking west.


? We continue our series of reports about the installation of solar panels for lighting the visitors parking lot and the visitors path from the parking lot to the visitors center.
[See prior reports from 2/18 through 3/3, 3/10 and 3/12/08].
The workshop digs a trench for the utility lines along the visitors path. ? We continue our series of reports about the installation of solar panels for lighting the visitors parking lot and the visitors path from the parking lot to the visitors center.
[See prior reports from 2/18 through 3/3, 3/10 and 3/12/08].
The workshop digs a trench for the utility lines along the visitors path.


? Construction crew David Ledbetter installs wiring to lighting fixtures along the path from the visitors parking lot to the Crafts III Visitors Center.


? Breaker boxes are installed at a distribution point close to the visitors parking-lot and behind the Crafts III building [Brendan Scott and David Ledbetter].
Final report on the AOT grant activities will be posted on 3/19/08.


? We continue our series of reports about the installation of a set of solar panels that will provide power for lighting in the visitors parking lot and for the visitors path from the parking lot to the entrance of the visitors center.
[See prior reports from 2/18 through 3/3/08].
The frame to hold the solar panels has been completed and utilities manager Scott Riley and crew Brendan Scott install the first panel. ? We continue our series of reports about the installation of a set of solar panels that will provide power for lighting in the visitors parking lot and for the visitors path from the parking lot to the entrance of the visitors center.
[See prior reports from 2/18 through 3/3/08].
The frame to hold the solar panels has been completed and utilities manager Scott Riley and crew Brendan Scott install the first panel.


? Construction crew David Ledbetter and Brendan tighten the panels to the steel frame.
The top of the Crafts III Visitors Center is visible in the background.
Arizona State University, under the leadership of Program Manager William Shisler, has awarded Arcosanti this gift of solar panels from their Photovoltaic Testing Laboratory.


? Our site electrician Dr. Sparks, in an interview with BigBug Canyon Country News reporter Bruce Colbert:
"The real coup was getting the eight solar panels. Arizona State University Photovoltaic Testing Laboratory donated the solar panels to us. The ASU PTL tests the paenls for their wattage capacity, heat and humidity durability and basically put the panels through the wringer to see how they stand up, then they gave them to us."
We send a very big THANK YOU to William Shisler and the ASU Photovoltaic Testing Laboratory.
Report continues on 3/13/08.


? In October of 2007, the Arizona Office of Tourism (AOT) rewarded a Rural Tourism Development Grant to Arcosanti. The grant, worth $50,000, will be used to enhance the Visitors' Parking and Access area of the site.
We reported on 12/12, 12/17, 12/19, 12/21 and 12/26 about the first stage of work, installation of new concrete walk-ways and an upgrade of the visitors parking-lot. ? In October of 2007, the Arizona Office of Tourism (AOT) rewarded a Rural Tourism Development Grant to Arcosanti. The grant, worth $50,000, will be used to enhance the Visitors' Parking and Access area of the site.
We reported on 12/12, 12/17, 12/19, 12/21 and 12/26 about the first stage of work, installation of new concrete walk-ways and an upgrade of the visitors parking-lot.
We continue the series of reports on the second stage of work [posting started on 2/18/08], about installation of solar panels and lighting.
Reporter Stephen Colbert interviewed Arcosanti site electrician Dr. Sparks and published a story about the solar installing in the Feb. 6. 2008 issue of the Big Bug / Canyon Country News. From the interview:
Dr. Sparks: "We couldn't have done it without Ben Mancini of EV Solar Products in Chino Valley. The lighting system is totally off the grid."
"We've got 16 storage batteries and the system produces about 9 kilowatts per day. Even with a power outage, we can run the lights for 2 - 3 days." [photo: Dr. Sparks with Ben Mancini of EV Solar Products in Chino Valley, picking up the control and distribution unit for the solar panels and lighting].


? A sturdy storage shed with interior shelving was purchased from Lowe's and assembled right next to the solar panel frame.


? The bank of batteries and the control unit have been mounted in place inside of the shed and site electrician Brendan Scott works on the wiring.
We continue this report on 3/10/08.


? We continue our report about the installation of a set of solar panels that will provide power for lighting in the visitors parking lot and for the visitors path from the parking lot to the entrance of the visitors center.
The support structure is in place and has been painted. ? We continue our report about the installation of a set of solar panels that will provide power for lighting in the visitors parking lot and for the visitors path from the parking lot to the entrance of the visitors center.
The support structure is in place and has been painted.


? The steel frames for the solar panels are mounted onto the cylindrical girder in such a way that the frame can be adjusted to the angle of the sun.


? Here we can see the heavy brackets in place [see the welding process in report from 2/27/08].
This work was made possible by a Rural Tourism Development Grant of $50,000, received from the Arizona Office of Tourism (AOT), to enhance the Visitors' Parking and Access area of the site.
We continue this series of reports on 3/3/08.